Sunday, October 16, 2005

To Paraphrase Proudhon, "Text Is Theft"

I stole the following text (or as they say in the lit crit world, "extracted it from its previous mistextualization and attributionlessly recontextualized it") from here. It somehow reminds me of my long-ago days as a grad student at Duke University. What really bugs me is, I'm almost certain it's a parody; though when it comes to literary criticism, you can never quite be sure:
Modernism in the works of Pynchon

Barbara la Tournier
Department of Politics, University of Michigan

1. Postdialectic construction and Debordist situation
The characteristic theme of the works of Eco is the difference between class and sexual identity. If textual discourse holds, we have to choose between Debordist situation and Lyotardist narrative. However, Bataille uses the term 'modernism' to denote the failure, and thus the meaninglessness, of precultural class.

In the works of Eco, a predominant concept is the concept of capitalist language. Abian[1] suggests that we have to choose between Debordist situation and cultural deappropriation. Thus, Sontag uses the term 'neocapitalist theory' to denote not, in fact, sublimation, but subsublimation.

"Society is part of the meaninglessness of sexuality," says Baudrillard; however, according to Dahmus[2] , it is not so much society that is part of the meaninglessness of sexuality, but rather the paradigm, and some would say the futility, of society. The subject is contextualised into a Debordist situation that includes reality as a paradox. It could be said that an abundance of discourses concerning the defining characteristic, and eventually the absurdity, of material class may be revealed.

"Consciousness is responsible for capitalism," says Derrida. Subtextual socialism implies that narrativity is capable of intent. However, the genre of modernism prevalent in Fellini's Amarcord is also evident in 8 1/2, although in a more predialectic sense.

The premise of textual capitalism holds that the task of the writer is social comment. In a sense, the main theme of Humphrey's[3] essay on subtextual socialism is the bridge between class and art.

Debordist situation suggests that the collective is capable of truth, but only if culture is distinct from sexuality; if that is not the case, we can assume that truth is used to marginalize the proletariat. However, the primary theme of the works of Fellini is not dedeconstructivism, as Foucault would have it, but neodedeconstructivism. Bataille promotes the use of the textual paradigm of narrative to challenge class divisions. Thus, the subject is interpolated into a subtextual socialism that includes art as a reality.

In Amarcord, Fellini denies modernism; in La Dolce Vita, although, he affirms Debordist situation. However, the characteristic theme of Long's[4] critique of postmodernist narrative is the role of the reader as observer.

The subject is contextualised into a subtextual socialism that includes language as a whole. It could be said that many desublimations concerning textual nationalism exist.

The premise of modernism holds that sexuality is capable of significance. Thus, Debord uses the term 'neostructuralist narrative' to denote not discourse, but subdiscourse.

2. Fellini and subtextual socialism
If one examines modernism, one is faced with a choice: either accept Marxist capitalism or conclude that the goal of the artist is significant form. If modernism holds, we have to choose between the semiotic paradigm of discourse and postcultural theory. However, the main theme of the works of Fellini is a mythopoetical reality.

"Sexual identity is intrinsically elitist," says Derrida; however, according to Parry[5] , it is not so much sexual identity that is intrinsically elitist, but rather the genre, and subsequent failure, of sexual identity. Baudrillard suggests the use of subtextual socialism to modify and attack society. But the subject is interpolated into a modernism that includes truth as a paradox.

If one examines subtextual socialism, one is faced with a choice: either reject the textual paradigm of expression or conclude that reality comes from communication, but only if Sontag's analysis of subtextual socialism is valid. Debord uses the term 'Debordist situation' to denote the rubicon, and eventually the stasis, of neocultural sexuality. However, the subject is contextualised into a subtextual socialism that includes consciousness as a totality.

"Class is part of the absurdity of sexuality," says Lacan; however, according to de Selby[6] , it is not so much class that is part of the absurdity of sexuality, but rather the collapse of class. Foucault uses the term 'Debordist situation' to denote not situationism per se, but subsituationism. In a sense, the example of modernism which is a central theme of Eco's The Aesthetics of Thomas Aquinas emerges again in Foucault's Pendulum.

A number of deappropriations concerning the role of the poet as artist may be found. However, in The Limits of Interpretation (Advances in Semiotics), Eco analyses subtextual socialism; in Foucault's Pendulum, however, he affirms Debordist situation.

Marx promotes the use of subtextual socialism to challenge sexism. In a sense, Lacan uses the term 'modernism' to denote a conceptualist reality.

The characteristic theme of Hanfkopf's[7] critique of subtextual socialism is the role of the reader as writer. However, McElwaine[8] suggests that we have to choose between neoconstructivist cultural theory and subsemiotic nationalism.

Modernism holds that the significance of the observer is deconstruction. Therefore, if Debordist situation holds, the works of Tarantino are not postmodern.

Foucault uses the term 'capitalist appropriation' to denote the meaninglessness, and therefore the paradigm, of neomodernist reality. In a sense, the main theme of the works of Tarantino is not, in fact, narrative, but prenarrative.


--------------------------
1. Abian, J. H. ed. (1970) The Expression of Collapse: Subtextual socialism in the works of Fellini. University of Georgia Press

2. Dahmus, T. K. I. (1982) Modernism in the works of Mapplethorpe. University of North Carolina Press

3. Humphrey, C. ed. (1979) Postconceptualist Theories: Subtextual socialism and modernism. And/Or Press

4. Long, H. Z. (1985) Modernism in the works of Madonna. Harvard University Press

5. Parry, W. ed. (1970) The Dialectic of Consciousness: Modernism in the works of Eco. University of Michigan Press

6. de Selby, Q. B. W. (1983) Modernism and subtextual socialism. University of California Press

7. Hanfkopf, H. Y. ed. (1970) Postmodern Semanticisms: Modernism in the works of Tarantino. Panic Button Books

8. McElwaine, F. Y. L. (1986) Nihilism, modernism and capitalist discourse. Loompanics
After reading all that, I have only two questions:

(1) Where are the obligatory references to the writings of Pierre Bourdieu?

(2) Why didn't they shoehorn in the term bricolage? ;-)

3 Comments:

Anonymous Lucy said...

This is definitely the work of someone that enjoyed "The Crying Of Lot 49".

Monday, October 17, 2005 9:55:00 AM  
Blogger Francis W. Porretto said...

Paul, it is absolutely impossible to parody something that already parodies itself.

On the other hand, there's no harm in trying, and often a lot of fun.

Monday, October 17, 2005 6:55:00 PM  
Anonymous Bret said...

This is a hoax: this "essay" was created by a computer program called "Postmodernism Generator", and you can reach this site at

www.elsewhere.org/pomo

It is frickin' hilarious. This site will generate completely random "essays" which are almost indistinguishable from many grad-school lit crit writings.

Saturday, July 08, 2006 11:55:00 PM  

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